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CURRICULUM VITAE:
L. KIP WHEELER
2002 Carolyn Drive
Jefferson City, Tennessee 37760
(865) 471-0479
kwheeler@cn.edu
English Department
Carson-Newman College
Jefferson City, Tennessee 37760
(865) 471-3283
 
To download a PDF version of this c.v., click here. (TBA)

EDUCATION:

Ph.D.

University of Oregon, August 2001
Major field: Fourteenth-century literature (Chaucer)
Minor fields: Computer-assisted composition, Bible as literature, Medieval rhetoric, Old English

M.A.

West Texas A & M University, August 1995
Major field: English literature

B.A.

West Texas State University, May 1993
Major field: English
graduated summa cum laude
DISSERTATION:
Title: "Of Pilgrims and Parables: The Influence of the Vulgate Parables on Chaucer's Canterbury Tales"
Committee: James Earl (chair), Warren Ginsberg, Anne Laskaya, Stephen Shoemaker

While all Chaucerian critics agree that the Bible had a profound influence on Chaucer, the tendency has been to locate that influence primarily on the level of Biblical allusion or exegetical readings of his work rather than to seek it in narrative structure. On the narrative level, Italian and French sources traditionally have been seen as more influential in his work due to the appearance of identical themes, characters, or "verbal echoes" in Chaucer's language. My dissertation argues that the structure of the Canterbury Tales shows signs of Biblical influence on a narrative level, particularly from the New Testament parables in the Vulgate Bible. It traces Chaucer's allusions to the parables in the Canterbury Tales, as well as imagery adapted from the parables, as evidence of his familiarity with them. It then proceeds to examine the tales as embedded narratives within larger narratives, akin to the structure of parables within the Vulgate as embedded narratives within the larger narrative of the Gospels themselves.

MASTER'S THESIS:

Title: "Chaucer's Fabliaux: A Rogue's Rhetoric in Text and Illumination"
Committee: Shearle Furnish (chair), Charmazel Dudt (supervisor while abroad)

My master's thesis involved a summer-long paleographical study of the marginal illumination of an early Canterbury Tales text (Lansdowne Manuscript 851) in the British Museum. While the Ellesmere Manuscript in the Huntington Library has garnered a greater share of critical attention due to its fine quality, lesser known manuscripts like the Lansdowne are important in that they contain marginalia revealing the responses of medieval readers to Chaucer's works we would not otherwise be able to access. For my thesis, I examined the marginal depictions found in his fabliaux and the accompanying portrait of the pilgrim storyteller. The fabliaux in Fragment I (the first four tales) in particular contain a more favorable response to these pilgrims and their tales than we might expect from their rhetorically ambiguous descriptions in the General Prologue.

PUBLICATIONS:

Assistant Editor, Literature in Context: Restoration Through Postmodernism. 2nd edition. Vol. 2 Boston, MA: Pearson Publishing, 2008. 2 Vols.

Translator, "Anglo-Saxon Riddles by Saint Aldhelm and Anonymous Authors." Literature in Context: Classicism, Middle Ages, and Renaissance. Ed. Gerald C. Wood et al. 2nd edition. Vol. 1. Boston: MA: Pearson Publishing, 2007. 211-14. 2 Vols.

Translator, "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Fit IV." Literature in Context: Classicism, Middle Ages, and Renaissance. Ed. Gerald C. Wood et al. 2nd edition. Vol. 1. Boston: MA: Pearson Publishing, 2007. 347-52. 2 Vols.

"Medieval Literature." The Historical Encyclopedia of Prostitution and Sex Work. Greenwood Press. 2006. (Survey of prostitution as depicted in medieval literature.)

"The Procrustean Teacher Takes on the Cloned Classroom: Cutting and Pasting as a Means of Productive Debate." Componere 1999-2000 (Componere is an instructional textbook for beginning teachers and graduate instructors at the University of Oregon.) 2000.

SCHOLARLY PAPERS PRESENTED:

"The Manuscript Zoo: Crowd-Sourcing as a Means of Textual Reconstruction". Faculty Forum At Carson-Newman College. Scheduled for November 2009."

"Teaching Medieval Mystics Through Mock HeresyTrials: A Second Look. " Session: "Teaching Heresies." Sponsored by Carson-Newman College. MART Conference. Carson-Springs Baptist Retreat, Tennessee, October 2009.

"Virtual Reconstruction of Fragmented Manuscripts." Session: "Textual Trauma: Violence Against Texts." 2009 Marco Manuscript Workshop University of Tennessee, Knoxville. 6 February 2009.

"Chaucer as Translator of the Vulgate Parables." Session: "Chaucer as Translator--The Latin Tradition," sponsored by The Chaucer Review. 43rd International Medieval Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2008.

"Chaucer and the Gospels: The Evidence for Lukan Parables." West Texas A & M University. Canyon, Texas. Presentation for the Department of English, Philosophy, and Modern Language. April 2008.

"The Lady of the Rings: Jewelry in Troilus and Criseyde." Session: "Costume in Chaucer," sponsored by the Medieval Association of the Midwest. 41st International Medieval Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, Michigan. May 2006.

"(Dis-)Order in the Court! Heresy Trials as Techniques for Teaching Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich." Session: "CSI Middle Ages: Fictive Trials in the Classroom," sponsored by TEAMS. 40th International Medieval Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2005.

"Taught in Translation? Injecting Classical and Ancient Vocabulary in Literature Surveys." 2005 SCOLT-FLANC Conference. Charlotte, North Carolina, February 2005.

"Weeding Out Lollardy." Session: "Pounding the Pulpit: Sermons and Social Gospels in the late Middle Ages," sponsored by Mark Amos of Southern Illinois University. 38th International Medieval Congress on Medieval studies. Kalamazoo, Michigan, 2003.

"'For it shal been secree': Confessional Inversion in the Shipman's Tale." Medieval and Early Modern Students of the Pacific Conference. Eugene, Oregon, 1999.

"Of Maps and Men: Tudor Cartography and Characterization." Eastern New Mexico University Graduate Research Conference. Portales, New Mexico, 1995.

"Teaching with Computers." University of Oklahoma Research Conference. Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 1994.

"Language and Literary Symbolism in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight." Sigma Tau Delta Literary Conference. Denver, Colorado, 1993.

PANELS, EDUCATIONAL PRESENTATIONS, AND ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS:

Co-Organizer along with Mary Baldridge, First MART (Medieval and Renaissance Teaching) Conference. Carson Springs Baptist Retreat, New Port, Tennessee, 29-31 October, 2009.

"Bram Stoker and Dracula's Theatrical Connections." Presentation for Honors Students attending the Honors Program trip to Abington, Virginia, 22 September 2007.

"Choosing the Honors Project." Presentation for Carson-Newman Honors Students. Emmanuel Baptist Church, Jefferson City, 29 August 2007.

"The Twenty-Minute Comedy of Errors: A Pre-Viewing Guide." Presentation for Honors Students attending the Honors Program trip to Atlanta Georgia. 30 September 2006.

"Report: ACA Trip to Greece." Appalachian College Association Summit. Abingdon, Virginia. 5 October 2006.

"Plagiarism: It Could Happen to You." Presentation for Carson-Newman Honors Students. Emmanuel Baptist Church, Jefferson City, 27 August 2006.

"Wizards, Witches, and Wardrobes." Presentation for Residence Life Association along with David McNeely and Bethany Bear. Swan Hall, Jefferson City, Carson-Newman College, January 2006.

"The C. S. Lewis You Never Knew." Presentation for Honors Students at the Appalachian Commons along with Mark Hussung, Walter Crouch, et al. Jefferson City, Carson-Newman College, November 2005.

"Courtly Love." History of Great Ideas Series for Liberal Arts Emphasis Week. Jefferson City, Carson-Newman College, February 2005.

"Tips on Teaching in the Computerized Classroom." Presentation to introduce new GTFs to the computerized classroom at the University of Oregon, March 2001. Organizer: Tara Montague.

"Composing Cybernetics: A World of Possibilities." Fall Composition Conference, University of Oregon, 2001.

Moderator and Organizer: "Sacred Identities: Character, Confession, and Introspection." Sponsored by the Oregon Medieval English Literature Society at the 36th International Medieval Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo, Michigan, May 2001.

"St. Augustine and Robbing Egyptian Gold." Roundtable Discussion: Medievalism and the Construction of the Literary. The Nature of the Literary Conference, University of Oregon, 1998.

"Saving Paper: How to Make the Most of Your Handouts." Fall Composition Conference, University of Oregon, 1998.

"Teaching Writing 121: Integrating Harvest with The Shape of Reason." Fall Composition Conference: The Body of Writing, University of Oregon, 1997.

Chair, English Medieval and Medievalist Poetry Session, WTAMU Research Conference. Canyon, Texas: West Texas A & M University, 1995.

Moderator, Medieval Art and Poetry Session, WTAMU Research Conference. Canyon, Texas: West Texas A & M University, 1994.

EMPLOYMENT:

Assistant Professor, Carson-Newman College: Fall 2003-Present
Visiting Assistant Professor, Gonzaga University: Fall 2002-Spring 2003
Postdoctoral Teaching Fellow, University of Oregon: Fall 2001-Spring 2002
Graduate Instructor, University of Oregon: Fall 1996-Spring 2001
Tutor, American English Institute, University of Oregon: Summer 1998-Fall 1998
Part-Time Instructor, West Texas A & M University: Fall 1995-Winter 1995
Writing Lab Supervisor, West Texas A & M University: Summer 1995
Graduate Instructor, West Texas A & M University: Fall 1993-Spring 1995
Writing Lab Tutor, West Texas State University: Fall 1991-Spring 1993

COMMITTEES AND DEPARTMENTAL WORK:

  • Global Diversity Committee, 2009 through present.
  • Facilities and Grounds and Committee, 2006-2008.
  • Honors Council. 2008-present.
  • Assisted Gerald Wood in editing and proofreading of revised editions of Writing at Carson -Newman and in compilation of First Year Writing at Carson-Newman.
  • Assisted in editing and proofreading of revised editions of English 201 custom textbook and English 301 custom textbook, Literature in Context, volumes one and two.
  • Responsible for updating and maintaining online archive of the English Department's digital photographs at Carson-Newman.
  • Liaison for maintaining and updating the English Department's Website at Carson-Newman.
  • Co-Director, Jon Coffee’s Honor Project: “What Generative Grammar ‘Does’ with ‘Do.’” First Co-Director: Michael Putnam. 2009-2010.
  • Reader, Stephanye Gaye’s Honors Project: “ShieldCross: An Exploration of Sequential Art.” 2008-2009.
  • Reader, Katie Mitchell’s Honors Project: “Growing up in Wonderland: An Analysis of Lacanian Subject Formation Within the Secondary World of Children’s Fantasy.” 2008-2009.
  • Reader, Ashleigh Wetmore’s Honors Project: “Wandering Warriors: Two 20th Century Icons of Revolution.” 2008-2009.
  • Co-Director, Shannon Korda's Senior Honor Project: "Mytheme-Molding in Milton and Tolkien: Christianity in Crisis" Second Co-Director: Jennifer Hall. 2007-2008.
  • Director, Benjamin Wilkinson's Senior Honor Project: "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight: Translation and Theory in Two Texts." 2006-2007.
  • Reader, Bethany Bear's Senior Honor Project: "Wild Swans and Sister-Saviors: Cultural Moments in the Life of an Indo-European Fairy Tale." Main project advisor: Dr. Shannon Collins. 2006.
  • Reader, Diana Lovelace's Senior Honor Project: "Kept from Knowledge: Contemporary Novelists Challenge Plato's Theories Concerning Thought Control." Main Project Advisors: Dr. Victoria Barker and Dr. Don Olive. 2005.
  • Composition Committee, University of Oregon English Department, 2000-2001.
  • Textbook Committee, University of Oregon English Department, 1998-1999.
  • Supervisor, Training of New Graduate Teaching Apprentices at University of Oregon English Department, 1997-1998, 1998-1999.
  • Harvest Committee, University of Oregon English Department, 1997-1998.

LITERATURE COURSES TAUGHT:

Authors of Courtly Love (English 451)
A study of medieval authors who wrote on the theme of courtly love and romantic attraction, including Andreas Capellanus, Marie de France, Chretien de Troyes, Geoffrey Chaucer, the Pearl Poet, and the Sir Orfeo poet
Ireland And Its Literature (Equivalent to English 301):
A course taught in Ireland focusing on major works in Irish literature from the medieval period up to the postmodern era, including tours of literary and historical sites in Ireland. The course is taught on-site in Ireland during alternate summer May terms.
Archetypes of Ireland (Equivalent to English 301)
A variant of "Ireland and its Literature" (above), this course studies archetypal imagery in Irish literature from the medieval period up to the postmodern era.
Arthurian Legends (English 479)
Study of the development of medieval Arthurian legends in translated Welsh, French, Latin, and original English sources including The Mabinogion, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, the Pearl Poet, and Sir Thomas Malory. The course culminates with post-medieval writings such as those of Alfred Lord Tennyson and T. H. White. Offered spring 2005.
Chaucer and His Circle (English 451)
Intensive study of Chaucer's poetry with brief forays into works by Gower, Froissart, Machaut, and the 15th century Chaucerians. Primary readings in the London dialect of Middle English. Offered every other year.
Middle English Dialects (English 390)
Survey of four Middle English dialects as appearing in the works of specific authors including Chaucer (London dialect), the Pearl Poet (West Midlands), the Sir Orfeo Poet (Southern), and Thomas Chester (Kentish).
Studies in the Novel: Science Fiction Narratives (English 340)
Study of the development of science fiction narratives with an emphasis on the novel. The material ranges from early Renaissance writings like Francis Bacon's New Atlantis and finishes with the postmodern Cyberpunk movement. Most readings are from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Offered spring 2007.
Gender in Greco-Roman Literature (English 391)
Study of how classical Greco-Roman authors portray masculinity and femininity. Translated Greek texts include Homer's Odyssey, Aristophanes' Lysistrata, Plato's Symposium, and various plays by Euripides and Aeschylus. Roman texts include Virgil's Aeneid, Apuleius' The Golden Ass, and Ovid's Art of Love. Offered as an independent study in the summer of 2006.
Classical Mythology (English 474)
A study of mythology in Greco-Roman culture and literature from the Homeric period up through the Augustan and Patristic ages with an emphasis on how religious practices appear in poetic texts. Course content developed out of the ACA summer study in Greece (May 2006). Offered in the spring of 2008.
Major American Authors: Poe and Hawthorne (English 450)
A comparative study of the poetry, short stories, and longer prose work of Edgar Allan Poe and Nathaniel Hawthorne. The course emphasizes allegorical and gothic aspects of the works. Offered as an independent study in the summer of 2005.
British Literature I (English 362)
A survey of representative British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century for junior-level English majors at Carson-Newman College. Offered regularly.
Advanced Composition, Grammar, and Language Studies (English 328)
Study of the history of the English language and the development of English grammar leading up to modern debates in composition theory. Offered fall terms.
Viking Sagas and Anglo-Saxon Adventures (English 270/German 320)
Team-taught course with Dr. Michael Putnam. Study of Old Norse/Icelandic Sagas and continental Germanic medieval literature compared to Anglo-Saxon literature. Readings include Tacitus, Njal's Saga, Grettir's Saga, the Nibelungenlied, and various Anglo-Saxon poetic and prose works. Offered summer 2008.
Introduction to the Liberal Arts (LA 101)
A course for new students at Carson-Newman College introducing them to the history of Carson-Newman and our place in the Liberal Arts tradition. Each LA 101 course is individually shaped around a topic of interest to the professor and how that topic relates to the Liberal Arts. My own LA 101 course for the Fall 2008 class focuses on science fiction novels and the way these narratives depict the human condition.
Writing and Literary Studies III (English 301)
A mandatory course at Carson-Newman College emphasizing literary research and thematic analysis of literary texts from the Enlightenment through the Postmodern period. Offered regularly.
Writing and Literary Studies II (English 201)
A mandatory course at Carson-Newman College emphasizing literary research, library usage, critical thinking, and thematic analysis of literary texts from the Classical Age through the Renaissance. Offered regularly.
Chaucer (English 523/423)
Gonzaga University's survey of Chaucer's major works, including The Canterbury Tales, Troilus and Criseyde, The Book of the Duchess, The Parliament of Birds, and minor poems. The course covers the Great Vowel Shift and assists students with Middle English pronunciation in the London dialect. Offered at both the graduate level and the undergraduate level.
Middle English Survey (English 520/320):
Gonzaga University's survey of Middle English prose, drama, and poetry, excluding Chaucer, with brief samples of Old English and Middle French works in translation as a contrast to better highlight the unique traits of Middle English. The course covers the Great Vowel Shift and assists students with Middle English pronunciation in the original dialect spellings. Texts include Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Pearl, Mankind, Piers Plowman, Le Mort d'Arthur, and assorted Middle English lyrics and writings by female mystics. Offered at both the graduate level and the undergraduate level.
Literary Genres (English 102)
Gonzaga University's survey of major works in prose, poetry, and drama, with an emphasis of genre conventions and close reading. Authors include Sophocles, Donne, Shakespeare, Ibsen, Dickinson, Whitman, Keats, Shelley, Coleridge, Hawthorne, Steinbeck, Poe, Faulkner, Chopin, Jackson, Cisneros, Porter, Nash, and others.
Writings About Medieval Monsters (English 199)
This experimental course at the University of Oregon explores the changes in the literary depictions of monsters. The class covers the end of the classical period up through early Renaissance texts. Texts include bestiaries, epic literature, sagas, demonological treatises, and the early Renaissance witch-hunting guide, the Malleus Maleficarum.
Introduction to Shakespeare's Early Works (English 207):
A sophomore-level course at the University of Oregon, the class focuses on the sonnets and early plays of Shakespeare, with exercises in scansion, meter, classroom performance, and poetic composition. In various incarnations, the course has focused on themes such as "disguise and desire" and "the decay of chivalry."
Introduction to Shakespeare's Later Works (English 208)
A sophomore-level course at the University of Oregon, the class focuses on the later plays of Shakespeare, with particular emphasis on tragedy and Jacobean politics. In various incarnations, the course has focused on the supernatural elements in Shakespeare's later plays and on the problem of evil within those plays.
Introduction to Fiction (English 107)
A freshman-level course for non-English majors at the University of Oregon, the class focuses on the short story and the novel. Selected readings include Nathaniel Hawthorne, Edgar Allan Poe, William Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, and Shirley Jackson.
Introduction to the English Major: Medieval through Renaissance*
(English 220)
The first in a three-term, mandatory survey series for English majors at the University of Oregon, the course covers material ranging from Anglo-Saxon writings such as Beowulf to Renaissance poetry such as The Faerie Queen.
Introduction to the English Major: Romanticism through Modernism* (English 222)
The last in a three-term, mandatory survey series for English majors at the University of Oregon, the course begins with the English Romantic movement and American Transcendentalism, then continues chronologically to postmodern literature.
Survey of Ancient and Classical Literature* (English 104)
A freshman-level humanities course at the University of Oregon, the class contrasts the literature, philosophy, and early history of classical Greco-Roman culture with that of classical China.
 
Note: *indicates a discussion section within a larger lecture

COMPOSITION COURSES TAUGHT:

Writing and Literary Studies I (English 101)
A mandatory freshman course at Carson-Newman College emphasizing grammar, mechanics, style, punctuation, usage, and development, including introduction to literary analysis with an emphasis on Appalachian writers. Offered regularly.
Basic Composition (English 101)
A mandatory, semester-long course at both Gonzaga University and West Texas A&M University that requires students to write several essays largely following the traditional modes. Sample papers include description, narration, comparison/contrast, analytical critique, and argumentative writing.
Basic Grammar and TASP Remediation (English 099)
An introductory course for at-risk students at West Texas A&M University who have failed the statewide TASP examination, this class provides assistance with basic language skills including punctuation, grammar, and mechanics.
Freshman Composition I (Writing 121)
Writing 121 is the first course in a two-term series of classes devoted to college expository writing and critical reading. Its primary focus is on written reasoning and persuasive argumentation.
Freshman Composition II (Writing 122)
The second in a two-term series of mandatory writing courses at the University of Oregon, Writing 122 continues to work toward the goal of Freshman Composition I. It focuses on specific ways to develop argumentative essays in response to increasingly complex contexts, which may include more sophisticated competing arguments and more challenging issues of debate.
Computer-Assisted Composition I
A variant of Writing 121, listed above, this course involves composition in a computerized classroom. The course's primary focus is that of Writing 121, successful argumentative writing and critical reading, but the class also deals with these issues in the context of HTML programming, web rhetoric, and word-processing.
Computer-Assisted Composition II
A variant of Writing 122, listed above, this course involves developing advanced argumentative essays, but deals with these issues in a computerized classroom, including the rhetoric of HTML programming, web rhetoric, and word-processing.
Writing the Research Paper (Writing 123)
A freshman-level course at the University of Oregon focusing on independent research and appropriate use of documented information, arguments, and counter-arguments found in relevant scholarly sources.

HONORS AND AWARDS:

  • Carson-Newman Faculty's Teaching Excellence and Leadership Award 2007.
  • Educational website honored as a "Feature of the Day" at Sal Touse's "Web Resources for Writers" 2004.
  • Two nominations, Graduate Teaching Fellow of the Year, University of Oregon, 2001
  • University of Oregon GTF Tuition Grant, 1996-2001
  • C.W. Foreman Scholarship for Academic Excellence, 1994-1995
  • President of Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society, Chi Theta Chapter, 1994
  • West Texas A & M University Tuition Grant, 1993-1995
  • Arlin Turner Memorial Scholarship, 1993
  • Mesa Petroleum Scholarship, 1990-1992
  • Member of Alpha Chi Honor Society
  • Member of Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society
  • Member of Phi Eta Sigma Honor Society

MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS:

  • Medieval Academy of America
  • Modern Language Association
  • New Chaucer Society
  • Oregon Medieval English Literature Society (member 1996-2002, president 2001)
  • Sigma Tau Delta Honor Society

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

    • Recipient of ACA-Mellon-CHS grant for curricular development in Greece: "Festivals and Sanctuaries of Ancient Greece." 31 May - June 11 2006.
    • Participant in teacher training at the Appalachian College Association's Teaching and Learning Institute, June 2004.

OTHER UNIVERSITY SERVICES:

    • Assisted Dr. Angie Wood in the Nursing Department by serving as a regional judge for HOSA competitors in the "prepared medical speech" category. January 2005, January 2006.
    • Assisted Dr. Ev Robertson in the Speech Department by providing Latin translation and pronunciation guide to theater students performing in The Comedy of Errors, February 2005.
    • Volunteer tutoring of students in basic Latin grammar (2004-present).

SPECIAL SKILLS:

Computer-Assisted Instruction:
Taught or tutored in computerized classrooms at three different universities. Used the Daedalus Interchange for PC computers at West Texas A&M University to teach grammar and literature, and taught composition at the University of Oregon using the Blackboard Program (see above under "Composition Courses Taught"). Familiar with WebCT. Familiar with HTML editing software and web design. Familiar with Powerpoint for general classroom presentations.
Manuscript Work:
Extensive firsthand work with fifteenth-century Chaucer manuscripts in the British Museum as part of master's thesis research. Participated in digital photography of medieval manuscripts at Mount Angel Monastery, in Oregon, as part of work in the Oregon Medieval English Literature Society.
Languages:
Conversational fluency in Spanish, written understanding of French, Latin, and Anglo-Saxon. Currently studying Middle Welsh and Koine Greek.
ESL Tutoring:
Extensive tutoring work with non-native speakers of English, primarily Hispanic and Middle Eastern students at West Texas State University and Korean and Japanese students at the American English Institute in Oregon.
Editing:
Helped revise the new edition of Ellen Millsaps' grammar guide, Writing at Carson-Newman in the summer of 2005. Helped compile the freshman reader, First Year Writing at Carson-Newman, in the summer of 2005. Helped edit the revised editions of the English 201 and English 301 custom textbooks, Literature in Context, Volumes I and II. Served as co-editor in 1997 of Harvest: A Collection of Student Essays. (Harvest is a mandatory reader for freshmen composition students at the University of Oregon.)

REFERENCES:

Professor Shawn O'Hare
Chair of English Department,
Carson-Newman College
Jefferson City, TN 37760
phone: (865) 471-3451
e-mail: sohare@cn.edu
Professor James Earl
Department of English
1286 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
phone: (541) 346-3960
email: jwearl@oregon.uoregon.edu
 
 
Professor Warren Ginsberg
Department of English
1286 University of Oregon
Eugene, OR 97403
phone: (541) 346-1526
email: warren@oregon.uoregon.edu
 
Professor Mary Baldridge
Dean of Humanities
Carson-Newman College

Jefferson City, TN 37760
phone: (865)-471-3473
email: mbaldridge@cn.edu 
 

 

 

 
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